Winter Festival Craft and Vendor Show takes over Delta Plaza Mall

ESCANABA, Mich. (WLUC)- The city of Escanaba hosted one of its largest holiday craft shows Saturday. The Winter Festival Craft and Vendor Show at the Delta Plaza Mall in Escanaba.

The show was the perfect one stop shop for Christmas gift shopping. Vendors filled the mall selling all kinds of handmade goods. Santa Claus also made an appearance. Although many of the vendors were new this year, they say it’s a great place to start.

“Today is the first time I’ve ever done a vendor event so I was very nervous,” said Amberly Schmidt, a Photographer. “But everything is going well, it’s very busy.”

“The experience being a vendor has been really great,” said Sarah Boumpani of Color Bomb Creations. “Everybody’s very nice and helpful. It’s been a great experience.”

For more information on the winter festival show, and upcoming events in Escanaba, visit www.visitescanaba.com/

Ralph Gardner Jr: Portrait Of A Town

Here’s a holiday party throwing tip: if you want to make sure a desired person shows up make him or her your guest of honor. And if you really want to guarantee an impressive turnout, select, say, two or three hundred of your favorite friends and make all of them the guests of honor.

That wasn’t the only or even the main reason the Omi International Arts Center in Ghent, NY had a full parking lot last Saturday night. But the exhibition that everybody was coming to see, and perhaps a few even to be seen, pretty much guaranteed a good head count.

Called “All of Us: Portraits Of The Ghent Bicentennial,” and shot by photographer and Ghent resident Richard Beaven, it was devoted to images of 275 of the town’s residents. Quite a few of the photographer’s subjects showed up.

“Over eighty percent of the people I didn’t know,” Richard, a professional photographer whose work has appeared frequently in the Wall Street Journal, told me as we toured the show the afternoon before it opened. “Which is kind of the point.”

The subjects included lifelong residents, weekenders and everything in between. The only biographical information provided were their names and how long they’d resided in the town. “How did I decide who’s in it?” Richard asked rhetorically.

Actually, it wasn’t a rhetorical question. He was responding to one about why he’d failed to include my mug, even though I didn’t take the omission personally.

“There’s no science to it,” he added. “I hope this feels like a good representation of the town. We live in our own bubbles. I wanted to explore the other bubbles.”

Richard told me that he was informed by road commissioner Ben Perry – Ben made the cut, standing outside the town garage and posed before the piles of salt that will find their way onto local roadways this winter – that there are 149 miles of roads in Ghent.

“I’ve been down 147 of them,” the photographer said.

Richard performed a somewhat similar exercise prior to the last Presidential election when he took portraits of Trump voters. Not just any Trump voter but those passionate enough about their candidate that they created their own yard signs.

One of them, of a voter named “Bear” Brandow, his sign large enough that it covered the side of a building in Gloversville, NY — that moody image somehow managing to capture the hope and anger of many who voted for the real estate and reality TV mogul — found its way into a show at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Many of the subjects in Richard’s current show ostensibly have nothing in common except for the coincidence that they happen to reside in the same bucolic upstate New York town. The project materialized after he was approached by Patti Matheney, a member of the town board, who wondered whether he had any photographs they could post on the Town of Ghent website to honor the bicentennial.

Individually, each image holds its own as a work of art. Richard shot all of them using an old Pentax medium format film camera. They’re colorful and the backgrounds are gently blurred, drawing the viewer’s eye towards the person at the photograph’s center.

But there’s also something more profound going on. Richard said his goal was to create the contemporary equivalent of a 19th or 20th century “box of prints in the basement,” that will serve as a tactile historical document when people examine them fifty or a hundred years from now.

Ironically, in the age of digital photography and the cellphone, when capturing fleeting moments has become effortless, they’ve also become somewhat devalued. Most of them never get printed. If they qualify as artifacts, they’re only of the most haphazard kind.

Yet what Richard has managed to accomplish in “All Of Us” is to show that something deeper, something that is often not readily visible and even ignored, unites us. And it’s something larger than the simple fact that all of the people portrayed in this show – children and the elderly, white and black, farmers and supermarket employees, hunters, artists, writers and bank tellers – share a common, uplifting humanity.

That’s why I suggest you see the show which runs through January 3rd. It makes no difference whether you live in the town of Ghent or not.

What it brought to mind was a famous 1976 issue of Rolling Stone magazine shot by Richard Avedon. That was composed of 73 black and white portraits of some of the most notable people in America at the time. It coincided with another bicentennial, that of the United States, and that summer’s political conventions.

Among the underembellished portraits, pores and all, were those of Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Nelson Rockefeller, Katherine Graham, Henry Kissinger, Rose Mary Woods and Caesar Chavez.

What riveted the viewer then was that sense that you were somehow seeing behind the armor that all of us wear as we wander through life, the masks of the famous and powerful the most opaque of all.

This show is similarly revelatory. Richard Beaven, who used to be an advertising executive – “advertising is about understanding human behavior so you can change it,” he told me – shot and sometimes reshot the same subjects.

“Most of these were not spontaneous,” he said. “They knew I was coming to take a photograph. They could decide what they were going to wear.”

What all of them have in common is the luster of psychological truth. And Richard treats every subject with dignity and respect.

“We’re in very divided times,” the photographer said. “It made me realize we actually have more in common than divides us.”

Ralph Gardner, Jr. is a journalist who divides his time between New York City and Columbia County. More of his work can be found at ralphgardner.com

The views expressed by commentators are solely those of the authors. They do not necessarily reflect the views of this station or its management.

Woman shares memories in watercolor

ANDERSON — Don’t let Kathie Pauley hear you say there’s nothing to do in Anderson.

Or, for that matter, that the city used to be so much better “back in the day.”

“I read quite a bit on Facebook, and there are quite a lot of negative comments from people saying there’s nothing to do. Well, by golly, there is more to do in Anderson than there ever was,” Pauley said. “You just have to make up your mind that Anderson is what you want it to be.”

So when the nearly lifelong Andersonian artist sat down to capture her hometown in watercolor, she made sure to show the city’s history, while also highlighting new additions or longstanding locations that have found new life.

She began by sketching out the city’s center, Dickmann Town Center and the “Three Graces” bronze statue of three ballerinas dancing in a fountain.

Then she turned to a historical post, the old Interurban circa 1920 and a Gaslight Festival banner from the same area.

The Toast, Lemon Drop and Madison Heights High School also made the final cut — along with dozens of other Anderson artifacts and standouts.

“So I just wanted to show there is still a lot here … I feel like that really ground us,” she said. “Anderson is just it’s a good place to live, we’ve got goodhearted people, and it’s really the only hometown I have had. It’s just a special place.”

Once she’d finished, Pauley posted it to her Facebook account and sent it to a few friends.

The requests to buy it started pouring in instantly.

“I had several people ask to buy the painting and rather than select a buyer, I opted to print posters, making it an affordable option for anyone who wants one,” she said.

She’s already sold dozens, a testament, she says, to the droves of residents and former hometowners who still hold affection for the town much like herself.

“Anderson is fully alive and it’s just changed, and it’s just now not the employment capital of Indiana but it’s certainly got a lot to offer for families,” she said. “There’s certainly a lot of work to be done, but that’s every community.”

The fact that Pauley is selling anything at all is somewhat counter to the reason she took up a brush to begin with.

For the longest time, she worked with a jeweler in Indianapolis, crafting handmade jewelry for the company alongside her job as an accountant with MacAllister Machinery in Indy.

“Just working 40 hours and doing all the jewelry, I just got burned out, so I decided to do something just for me,” she said.

So she sought out watercolor, because, unlike many types of painting, mistakes can’t be patched over.

“I find it to be a good medium, for me, because a lot of artists don’t use it, it’s not forgiving, like oil painting,” she said. “If you are three-quarters of the way through and you make a huge mistake, you either have to rework the entire project or work something else out.”

Her first work was a lighthouse, just a memory pulled from her head.

Memories are important to Pauley, whether it’s from years of going to the Indiana State Fair or a near-lifetime living in Anderson, which she left seven years ago when she married her husband. More recently she’s begun painting over old hymnal pages, a way to add color to the memories most people associate with their favorite church song.

“I am very sentimental. Family is extremely important and the legacy you leave,” she said. “And also what was left for you … when you think about (for instance) my aunt loved this perfume, or she loved this song, these bring back memories of good things and that’s important to try to capture.”

From just something fun to keep herself busy, Pauley’s paintings have grown to a new venture, one that’s seen her star in two gallery shows in Indianapolis as well as built a burgeoning business of buyers for prints and originals.

And much like the rush to bid on her Anderson piece pushed Pauley to move into making prints, a demand for many of her other pieces is also having her look at making more prints available so, much like herself, people can keep their own memories alive in watercolor and parchment.

Finding the Heart of a Nation in Generations of Black Art

Norman Lewis, “America the Beautiful” (1960) oil on canvas, 50 x 64 inches (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

In the first gallery of the Soul of a Nation exhibition at Brooklyn Museum one is confronted with a Manichean visual scheme. Except for Richard Mayhew’s “Pastoral” painting, which is itself a muted arrangement of heathery tones, this introductory room is monochrome, black made stentorian situated against shades of white, and white made vivid against ebony. How meaningful this contrast can be is illustrated by two paintings by Norman Lewis. The one that faces the viewer entering through the main doors, “Processional” (1965), contains a ground that is black, and an abstract array of interwoven, almost-cubist off-white figures wend across the canvas like an undulant line of figures seen through a fun-house telescope. Then, in another painting by Lewis, this one from 1960, the figures metastasize throughout the background, shrouded in white as if enrobed by it — some of them look like triangles with heads and two feet. Then there is a cross. I knew in that moment that if the story alluded to in the image played out, that cross would soon be on fire. The painting is titled “America the Beautiful.”

Norman Lewis, “Processional” (aka Procession),(1965) oil on canvas, 38 3/8 x 57 5/8 in. (97.5 x 146.4 cm); (private collection, © Estate of Norman W. Lewis; courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York)

In the very next room which is captioned “New York: The Kamoinge Workshop and Roy Decarava” that black-and-white motif continues, but takes on a documentary duty. Here among the works chronicling the lives of Black people are photographs by Herb Randall whose “New Jersey” (ca. 1960s) image of a semi-nude Black woman is tantalizing in its furtive angle and framing. Adger W. Cowans’s “Shadows, New York” (1961) is intimate in a very different way. Showing the heroically large shadows looming ahead of three figures walking a city block, the photo suggests something about the interior lives of Black people, the dreams they carried that made their lives seem fuller and richer than they may have been in daily practice. Then there is consistently astonishing work of Roy Decarava whose lighting schemes strategically carve his figures out of the darkness that surrounds them. Looking at his portrait of “Elvin Jones” (1961), I’m reminded of Rembrandt’s paintings, how from across the room you can tell that an image belongs to one or the other artist and the image only becomes more enthralling as one moves closer and discovers fugitive highlights here and there.

Adger W. Cowans, “Shadows, New York” (1961), silver gelatin print, 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm) (courtesy the artist)

When I move to a gallery bannered by the title “NY Revolutionary Images and Art World Activism” color begins to tumble into this story that is simultaneously being elaborated by region, by chronology, and by medium. Here Benny Andrews and Faith Ringgold stand out. Andrews’s figure in “Did the Bean Sit Under a Tree” (1969) caught within a frame that incarcerates him against a US flag that threatens to unroll and smother him, has his fists balled up in a boxer’s pose ready for this fight. Andrews’s figures are so earnest that they begin to come up off the canvas, built up to become three-dimensional reliefs. Alternatively, Ringgold’s “American People Series #18: The Flag is Bleeding” (1967) imagines the violence of this republic enmeshing all of its citizens. In her canvas, the US flag is superimposed on three figures — a petite white woman who stands between and links arms with a black man and a white man — while the red stripes bleed red onto them a nd onto the white field. This work implies that the nation itself is damaged, and that whatever has damaged it, has, in turn, brought grave harm to Black people. (I would argue it’s the psychic Gordian knot of founding a social order on the violent domination of a group of people while, without skipping a beat, declaring we are created equal, endowed with a set of rights from which we cannot be alienated.) The Black man is the only figure who is bleeding from a wound over his heart, and the only one to hold a knife in his free hand.

Benny Andrews (American, 1930-2006), “Did the Bear Sit Under a Tree?” (1969), oil on canvas with painted fabric collage and zipper, 50 x 61 ¾ x 2 ¼ in. (127 x 156.8 x 5.7 cm), (courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York. Emanuel Collection © 2018 Estate of Benny Andrews/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY)

All of this evocative chromatic movement subtly conveys the development of the Black Power movement that first took frank stock of the stark contrast between the nature of the lives of Black and White people given the concerted violence (political, social, economic, physical) meted out to Black people in defense of White supremacy. The movement turned inward cultivating a story of Black pride and self-sufficiency. Then it turned to face the dominant culture with a language, a set of hybrid aesthetics, and survivalist strategies, and began to flourish on its own terms. When I get to the gallery captioned “Chicago: OBAC and AfriCOBA” color becomes a tumultuous commotion. In the work of Wadsworth Jarrell, “Liberation Soldiers” and “Revolutionary” (both 1972), a small mosaic pattern made of the letter “B” for “beautiful” and “blackness,” in equal measure, makes up the facial features of Jarrell’s figures (Angela Davis and members of the Black Panther Party), but continues spinning out in increasingly large circles like a rhythmic and controlled detonation. This work is both beautiful and percussive. (A visual bonus is noticing that the bandolier worn by Davis and Huey P. Newton is brought into being by Jae Jarrell in his “Revolutionary Suit” [orig. 1969] which looks like it would indeed be worn by an urban woman warrior.) Displayed in the same room is Jeff Donaldson’s “Wives of Sango” (1971) which also incorporates a mottled color palette to develop faces and bodies, with foil added to make gleaming visual accents in portraits that valorize and lovingly mythologize Black women.

Wadsworth A. Jarrell (American, born 1929), “Revolutionary (Angela Davis)” (1971), acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 64 x 51 in. (162.6 x 129.5 cm) (© Wadsworth A. Jarrell; photo courtesy Brooklyn Museum)Jeff Donaldson, “Wives of Sango” (1971), paint, foil, and ink on cardboard, 36 ¼ × 25 9/16 in. (92 × 65 cm); (collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture; © Jeff Donaldson, courtesy Jameela K. Donaldson)

When I follow the show to the floor below, pausing on the staircase landing just a half-floor above Sam Gilliam’s “Carousel Change” (1970) to take it in, I can feel the shift in concerns. This section of the show represents a general move by Black artists toward posing questions to their mediums and wrapping their arms around aesthetic interests. The wall texts guide the reader there: “Delineating the Body”; “Rethinking the Surface”; “Foregrounding Movement and Action” show up. But then one could just look at “Carousel Change,” a painting that is languorously cool and yet intent about moving out from the strictures of the stretched canvas. I understand intuitively that for these artists freedom would not be, could not be taken for granted — it would be prodded and poked, dragged and stretched to find out how free being free actually might be. Thus we get in “Brilliantly Endowed (Self Portrait)” (1977) Barkley Hendricks posing naked in contrappos to with a hat, socks and sneakers, a toothpick held in his mouth, and his cool gaze looking right back at the viewer, like he would greet you in the street with “Hey baby, what’s happening?” The same deep desire to discover the shape and extent of artistic agency produce Frank Bowling’s long immersive canvases that contemplate atmospheres of color. When I visited the show a second time, a man who happened to be in the same gallery at the same time, looked at “Dan Johnson’s Surprise” (1969) and “Texas Louise” (1971) for longer than I did, and then sat down on a bench and looked some more. These paintings deserve and reward this attention.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, installation view, (center) Sam Gilliam, “Carousel Change” (1970) (photo by Jonathan Dorado, courtesy Brooklyn Museum)Frank BowIing, “Texas Louise” (1971), acrylic on canvas, 111 x 261 ¾ in. (282 x 665 cm) courtesy of the Rennie Collection, Vancouver © Frank Bowling (image courtesy the artist and Hales Gallery)

In all its explorations and truth-telling this exhibition is carefully and wisely curated by Ashley James. (It is not obvious how much James has tweaked the exhibition she inherited from Mark Godfrey and Zoe Whitley, the curators at Tate Modern where it was first mounted, or how much it changed in its previous installation at Crystal Bridges.) There are only a couple missteps: one of which is crowding together a group of loosely associated Los Angeles sculpture and assemblage artists: Noah Purifoy, Betye Saar, and John Outterbridge in a corner on the first floor. This display has the whiff of a garage sale (though it feels like James just ran out of room). And in the gallery near the end, I finally have Jack Whitten, Alma Thomas, Frank Bowling, Howardena Pindell, and Ed Clark in a room together talking amiably with each other. But Martin Puryear doesn’t belong in that room, and frankly gets in the way of the sibilant, but moving conversation about surface and color an d light.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, installation view (photo by Jonathan Dorado, courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

Soul of a Nation is both a smart and a necessary exhibition. It shows the interwoven and complex character of Black artistic production which incorporated distinct regions, artistic movements, schools of practice, political philosophies, and medium-specific concerns during those years between the late ’60s and mid ’80s when Black political consciousness began to cohere and realize its powers. However, something about the title seems off. I want to suggest that this socially and politically fractured nation state doesn’t really have a soul. That’s too ephemeral a metaphor. One might say this nation has a heart — a beating, pulsating, hammering organ of culture that circulates life-giving blood to other, core, vital organs (civic institutions, economic industry) and distal appendages (local community organizations). This might be a better analogy for the narrative that is articulated here and might more clearly explain why any truthful account made of artistic d evelopment in the United States during the latter half of the 20th century must include these artists. They concretize in objects those abstract notions of risk and of freedom — because they have long had skin in the game.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power continues at the Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York) through February 3. The exhibition was organized by Tate Modern in collaboration with the Brooklyn Museum and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, and The Broad, Los Angeles, and curated by Mark Godfrey and Zoe Whitley, at Tate Modern. The Brooklyn Museum presentation is curated by Ashley James.

Sequel to Napa Lighted Art Festival to feature parade, more exhibits

The return next month of the Napa Lighted Art Festival will bring more art and light to city streets – as well as music, lectures and a new parade to lead visitors through the event’s open-air gallery.

Organizers will increase the scope of the outdoor festival’s second edition to at least 16 installations in downtown, the Oxbow neighborhood and other areas, up from the nine that comprised its December 2017 debut, the Downtown Napa Association announced last week. Each display will include a Napa building or landmark transformed into a giant canvas through the use of projectors throwing animated images, motifs or patterns.

Jointly organized by the city and the Napa Tourism Improvement District, the Lighted Art Festival will run Jan. 12-20, 2019. Exhibits will be displayed from 6 to 10 p.m on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, and 6 to 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday.

Event planners moved the exhibition back from its original December date to attract visitors in a less hectic time of the winter, and to separate it from Christmas-season attractions such as holiday light displays, the city Parks and Recreation department has said.

Highlighting the festival will be the debut of the Lantern Parade, which will begin at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 18. The procession will pass by light exhibits on a route that begins and ends at downtown Veterans Memorial Park, and marchers are asked to carry homemade lanterns to illuminate the parade route.

Those wishing to march in the Lantern Parade can find an online lantern pattern guide at cityofnapa.org/lanternparade, and New Technology High School students are creating more lanterns for business owners to display in downtown store and office windows, according to city officials. Any such lighted devices should be battery-powered, and no open flames will be allowed.

Joining the festival slate is Art After Dark, a nighttime stroll of the Napa Valley Art Trail to view seven murals created as part of the Rail Arts District. The January event also will debut a series of symposia on projection art, light, stained glass and other topics, and live concerts will be scheduled downtown during the festival.

Among the artistic backdrops at the new festival will be some of the hot-air balloons that float tourists on aerial tours of the wine country. Night Bloom, slated for the Oxbow Commons downtown park, will feature tethered balloons arranged to light the evening sky. Balloons will be displayed starting at 6 p.m. Jan. 12-13 and Jan. 19-20, weather permitting.

The festival’s reach also will extend farther south in the city to The Village at Vista Collina Resort, which will host the artwork “Constellation” by Christopher Schardt. The light sculpture will take the form of a canopy dotted with numerous light-emitting diodes, or LEDs.

Other showpieces will include “Museum of the Moon,” an illuminated one-to-500,000 image of the moon by Luke Jerram that will be shown at CIA at Copia; “Hyperbinary,” which the Czech artist collective Triton Genos will exhibit at Napa’s Riverfront on Main Street; and a return engagement at First Presbyterian Church of Birgit Zander’s “The Language of Love,” a depiction of the words for love in numerous languages that was shown during the 2017 Napa festival.

Watercolor rendering of Dayton, Nevada done in 1984 by Jeff Nicholson brings $1,000 at auction

RENO, Nev. – An eclectic five-day auction that featured items ranging from a Chinese Hunan One Tael silver coin to a 150-year-old Idaho soda bottle to an antique wood ore car from a mine in Utah to Marilyn Monroe’s signed autograph was held December 5th-9th by Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC, online and in the gallery at 3555 Airway Drive (Ste. 308) in Reno.

The auction was nicknamed “to die for” because it featured a massive offering of token dies from the Northwest Territorial Mint Liquidation, but there were many other items in a wide array of collecting categories, a staggering 3,500 lots in all. Nearly 3,700 people registered to bid online via the platforms iCollector.com and Invaluable.com. The auction grossed a total of $355,825.

 “This was the second sale in what promises to be an exciting fall and winter season for us,” said Fred Holabird of Holabird Western Americana Collections. Offered was more of the Ken Prag American stock certificate collection; a Texas token collection; the Joe Elcano Nevada History Collection; and the Ben-Tchahvtchavadze Collection (Native Americana, rugs, weavings, art).

Day 1, on Wednesday, December 5th, was packed with minerals, vintage and antique bottles, tokens from Alabama to Oregon, and a wide selection of numismatics, to include banks, books, catalogs, coins, counterfeit directories, currency, medals, scales and “so-called” dollars – a total of 582 lots for the day. Also in the mix were 67 lots of tantalizing bargains and dealer specials.

Star lots from Day 1 included the Chinese Hunan One Tael silver piece, weighing 35.6 grams ($6,875); and the circa 1866-1869 Idaho City, Idaho soda bottle, from Pioneer Brown & Co. ($2,625). The blob top bottle, just over seven inches tall, had a very rare light green color. It is one of only a few known specimens of a Territorial soda bottle (Idaho was not yet a state then).

Day 2, Thursday, December 6th, contained 663 lots of tokens (from Texas on) and dies. Sold was a token from the White Elephant Saloon in Mobeetie, Tex. ($1,813). The obverse said, “Good for A Drink, Berry & Co., White Elephant Saloon.” The reverse said, “Chas. Peck & Co. / Chicago.”

Day 3, on Friday, December 7th, was a collector’s field day, bursting with 654 lots of general Americana, militaria, political items, postal history items, Wells Fargo & Express memorabilia, cowboy collectibles, firearms, weaponry, saloon, gaming and lots pertaining to Alaska mining.

The general Americana was a virtual entire category unto itself, with autographs, badges, checks, circus memorabilia, firemen collectibles, music items, navigation material, automobilia, outlaw and lawman memorabilia, silverware and flatware, World’s Fair & Expos collectibles and more.

Day 3 highlights included an unissued capital stock certificate #495 for the Alaska Commercial Company, Alaska’s largest rural retailer, with a vignette of Russian church and miners ($4,000); and a group of eleven 1950s-era 25-cent red gaming chips from Dopey Norman’s, one of the first gambling casinos in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, operated by entrepreneur Norman Reinburg ($2,000).

Day 4, on Saturday, December 8th, was jam-packed with 746 lots of mining material, to include artifacts, books, explosives, spoons and geographic sort from Arizona on. A top lot was a stock certificate #380 for Mass Mining Company of Pittsburgh, datelined Pittsburgh 1881 for a copper mine that is believed to have operated in Michigan. The certificate was for 120 shares ($3,375).

Also sold on Day 4 was the choice old wood ore car from a mine in Utah ($2,750). The 1870s-era car was three feet long, about two feet wide and had a payload area of about 11 inches deep. It held about one ton of high grade. Collectors are drawn to ore cars like this because of their tremendous character and “eye appeal”. Plus, they’re 50 times rarer than their iron counterparts.

Day 5, December 9th, featured textiles, Native Americana, jewelry and watches, entertainment industry items, furnishings, sculptures, art, railroadiana, imprinted revenue stamps and more.

Marilyn Monroe’s bold ink signature was presented along with a beautiful black and white photo of the actress, as well as her 1953 payroll card from 20th Century Fox, nicely framed and matted ($1,250). Also, a 1984 watercolor painting of Dayton, Nevada, done by artist Jeff Nicholson, known for his renderings of the high desert of the West, particularly of Nevada, brought $1,000.

A stock certificate for The Silverton Railroad (Colorado), issued in 1904 to Charles Graham in the amount of 996 shares, signed by company president Otto Mears and featuring a train exiting a tunnel vignette, realized $1,125. Also, a fine collection of Indian arrowheads from the Great Basin area of the United States, 67 pieces in all, nicely housed in an octagon case, made $938.

All prices quoted include the buyer’s premium.

Holabird Western Americana Collections’ next big auction is planned for Jan. 25-28, 2019, also online and in the Reno gallery. Anyone owning a collection that might fit into an upcoming Holabird auction is encouraged to get in touch. The firm travels throughout the U.S., to see and pick up collections. Last year it visited Boston, Florida, Seattle, New York and other locations.

Holabird Western Americana is always seeking quality bottle, advertising, Americana and coin consignments for future auctions. To consign a single piece or a collection, you may call Fred Holabird at 775-851-1859 or 844-492-2766; or, you can e-mail him at fredholabird@gmail.com. To learn more about Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC, log on to www.fhwac.com.

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Holabird Western Americana3555 Airway DriveReno, Nevadafredholabird@gmail.com(775) 851-1859http://www.fhwac.com Press Contact: Fred HolabirdHolabird Western Americana Collections, LLCP: (775) 851-1859fredholabird@gmail.com

Finding the Heart of a Nation in Generations of Black Art

Norman Lewis, “America the Beautiful” (1960) oil on canvas, 50 x 64 inches (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

In the first gallery of the Soul of a Nation exhibition at Brooklyn Museum one is confronted with a Manichean visual scheme. Except for Richard Mayhew’s “Pastoral” painting, which is itself a muted arrangement of heathery tones, this introductory room is monochrome, black made stentorian situated against shades of white, and white made vivid against ebony. How meaningful this contrast can be is illustrated by two paintings by Norman Lewis. The one that faces the viewer entering through the main doors, “Processional” (1965), contains a ground that is black, and an abstract array of interwoven, almost-cubist off-white figures wend across the canvas like an undulant line of figures seen through a fun-house telescope. Then, in another painting by Lewis, this one from 1960, the figures metastasize throughout the background, shrouded in white as if enrobed by it — some of them look like triangles with heads and two feet. Then there is a cross. I knew in that moment that if the story alluded to in the image played out, that cross would soon be on fire. The painting is titled “America the Beautiful.”

Norman Lewis, “Processional” (aka Procession),(1965) oil on canvas, 38 3/8 x 57 5/8 in. (97.5 x 146.4 cm); (private collection, © Estate of Norman W. Lewis; courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York)

In the very next room which is captioned “New York: The Kamoinge Workshop and Roy Decarava” that black-and-white motif continues, but takes on a documentary duty. Here among the works chronicling the lives of Black people are photographs by Herb Randall whose “New Jersey” (ca. 1960s) image of a semi-nude Black woman is tantalizing in its furtive angle and framing. Adger W. Cowans’s “Shadows, New York” (1961) is intimate in a very different way. Showing the heroically large shadows looming ahead of three figures walking a city block, the photo suggests something about the interior lives of Black people, the dreams they carried that made their lives seem fuller and richer than they may have been in daily practice. Then there is consistently astonishing work of Roy Decarava whose lighting schemes strategically carve his figures out of the darkness that surrounds them. Looking at his portrait of “Elvin Jones” (1961), I’m reminded of Rembrandt’s paintings, how from across the room you can tell that an image belongs to one or the other artist and the image only becomes more enthralling as one moves closer and discovers fugitive highlights here and there.

Adger W. Cowans, “Shadows, New York” (1961), silver gelatin print, 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm) (courtesy the artist)

When I move to a gallery bannered by the title “NY Revolutionary Images and Art World Activism” color begins to tumble into this story that is simultaneously being elaborated by region, by chronology, and by medium. Here Benny Andrews and Faith Ringgold stand out. Andrews’s figure in “Did the Bean Sit Under a Tree” (1969) caught within a frame that incarcerates him against a US flag that threatens to unroll and smother him, has his fists balled up in a boxer’s pose ready for this fight. Andrews’s figures are so earnest that they begin to come up off the canvas, built up to become three-dimensional reliefs. Alternatively, Ringgold’s “American People Series #18: The Flag is Bleeding” (1967) imagines the violence of this republic enmeshing all of its citizens. In her canvas, the US flag is superimposed on three figures — a petite white woman who stands between and links arms with a black man and a white man — while the red stripes bleed red onto them a nd onto the white field. This work implies that the nation itself is damaged, and that whatever has damaged it, has, in turn, brought grave harm to Black people. (I would argue it’s the psychic Gordian knot of founding a social order on the violent domination of a group of people while, without skipping a beat, declaring we are created equal, endowed with a set of rights from which we cannot be alienated.) The Black man is the only figure who is bleeding from a wound over his heart, and the only one to hold a knife in his free hand.

Benny Andrews (American, 1930-2006), “Did the Bear Sit Under a Tree?” (1969), oil on canvas with painted fabric collage and zipper, 50 x 61 ¾ x 2 ¼ in. (127 x 156.8 x 5.7 cm), (courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York. Emanuel Collection © 2018 Estate of Benny Andrews/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Courtesy Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York, NY)

All of this evocative chromatic movement subtly conveys the development of the Black Power movement that first took frank stock of the stark contrast between the nature of the lives of Black and White people given the concerted violence (political, social, economic, physical) meted out to Black people in defense of White supremacy. The movement turned inward cultivating a story of Black pride and self-sufficiency. Then it turned to face the dominant culture with a language, a set of hybrid aesthetics, and survivalist strategies, and began to flourish on its own terms. When I get to the gallery captioned “Chicago: OBAC and AfriCOBA” color becomes a tumultuous commotion. In the work of Wadsworth Jarrell, “Liberation Soldiers” and “Revolutionary” (both 1972), a small mosaic pattern made of the letter “B” for “beautiful” and “blackness,” in equal measure, makes up the facial features of Jarrell’s figures (Angela Davis and members of the Black Panther Party), but continues spinning out in increasingly large circles like a rhythmic and controlled detonation. This work is both beautiful and percussive. (A visual bonus is noticing that the bandolier worn by Davis and Huey P. Newton is brought into being by Jae Jarrell in his “Revolutionary Suit” [orig. 1969] which looks like it would indeed be worn by an urban woman warrior.) Displayed in the same room is Jeff Donaldson’s “Wives of Sango” (1971) which also incorporates a mottled color palette to develop faces and bodies, with foil added to make gleaming visual accents in portraits that valorize and lovingly mythologize Black women.

Wadsworth A. Jarrell (American, born 1929), “Revolutionary (Angela Davis)” (1971), acrylic and mixed media on canvas, 64 x 51 in. (162.6 x 129.5 cm) (© Wadsworth A. Jarrell; photo courtesy Brooklyn Museum)Jeff Donaldson, “Wives of Sango” (1971), paint, foil, and ink on cardboard, 36 ¼ × 25 9/16 in. (92 × 65 cm); (collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture; © Jeff Donaldson, courtesy Jameela K. Donaldson)

When I follow the show to the floor below, pausing on the staircase landing just a half-floor above Sam Gilliam’s “Carousel Change” (1970) to take it in, I can feel the shift in concerns. This section of the show represents a general move by Black artists toward posing questions to their mediums and wrapping their arms around aesthetic interests. The wall texts guide the reader there: “Delineating the Body”; “Rethinking the Surface”; “Foregrounding Movement and Action” show up. But then one could just look at “Carousel Change,” a painting that is languorously cool and yet intent about moving out from the strictures of the stretched canvas. I understand intuitively that for these artists freedom would not be, could not be taken for granted — it would be prodded and poked, dragged and stretched to find out how free being free actually might be. Thus we get in “Brilliantly Endowed (Self Portrait)” (1977) Barkley Hendricks posing naked in contrappos to with a hat, socks and sneakers, a toothpick held in his mouth, and his cool gaze looking right back at the viewer, like he would greet you in the street with “Hey baby, what’s happening?” The same deep desire to discover the shape and extent of artistic agency produce Frank Bowling’s long immersive canvases that contemplate atmospheres of color. When I visited the show a second time, a man who happened to be in the same gallery at the same time, looked at “Dan Johnson’s Surprise” (1969) and “Texas Louise” (1971) for longer than I did, and then sat down on a bench and looked some more. These paintings deserve and reward this attention.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, installation view, (center) Sam Gilliam, “Carousel Change” (1970) (photo by Jonathan Dorado, courtesy Brooklyn Museum)Frank BowIing, “Texas Louise” (1971), acrylic on canvas, 111 x 261 ¾ in. (282 x 665 cm) courtesy of the Rennie Collection, Vancouver © Frank Bowling (image courtesy the artist and Hales Gallery)

In all its explorations and truth-telling this exhibition is carefully and wisely curated by Ashley James. (It is not obvious how much James has tweaked the exhibition she inherited from Mark Godfrey and Zoe Whitley, the curators at Tate Modern where it was first mounted, or how much it changed in its previous installation at Crystal Bridges.) There are only a couple missteps: one of which is crowding together a group of loosely associated Los Angeles sculpture and assemblage artists: Noah Purifoy, Betye Saar, and John Outterbridge in a corner on the first floor. This display has the whiff of a garage sale (though it feels like James just ran out of room). And in the gallery near the end, I finally have Jack Whitten, Alma Thomas, Frank Bowling, Howardena Pindell, and Ed Clark in a room together talking amiably with each other. But Martin Puryear doesn’t belong in that room, and frankly gets in the way of the sibilant, but moving conversation about surface and color an d light.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power, installation view (photo by Jonathan Dorado, courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

Soul of a Nation is both a smart and a necessary exhibition. It shows the interwoven and complex character of Black artistic production which incorporated distinct regions, artistic movements, schools of practice, political philosophies, and medium-specific concerns during those years between the late ’60s and mid ’80s when Black political consciousness began to cohere and realize its powers. However, something about the title seems off. I want to suggest that this socially and politically fractured nation state doesn’t really have a soul. That’s too ephemeral a metaphor. One might say this nation has a heart — a beating, pulsating, hammering organ of culture that circulates life-giving blood to other, core, vital organs (civic institutions, economic industry) and distal appendages (local community organizations). This might be a better analogy for the narrative that is articulated here and might more clearly explain why any truthful account made of artistic d evelopment in the United States during the latter half of the 20th century must include these artists. They concretize in objects those abstract notions of risk and of freedom — because they have long had skin in the game.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power continues at the Brooklyn Museum (200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York) through February 3. The exhibition was organized by Tate Modern in collaboration with the Brooklyn Museum and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, and The Broad, Los Angeles, and curated by Mark Godfrey and Zoe Whitley, at Tate Modern. The Brooklyn Museum presentation is curated by Ashley James.

RoboCop Literally Shines In Craig Drake’s Latest Mysterious Art Show

a close up of a logo: The glimmering, shimmering foil edition of RoboCop by Craig Drake. (Image: All Images, Hero Complex Gallery) © Image: All Images, Hero Complex Gallery The glimmering, shimmering foil edition of RoboCop by Craig Drake. (Image: All Images, Hero Complex Gallery)

We are huge fans of artist Craig Drake. We’ve covered many of his art shows, and I even waited in line for 31 hours to buy one of his paintings earlier this year.

So it’s no surprise that we’re extremely excited about his upcoming fifth solo show, which opens Friday and coincides with a brand new book set.

But we can’t just show you images of the book set, beautiful as it may be. And the Hero Complex Gallery doesn’t like to reveal images from Drake’s art shows before the doors open. No, we’d need something else. A hero. Something to lay down the law. And preferably something that’s part man and machine. Here he is.

That’s our exclusive reveal of the foil variant of Craig Drake’s RoboCop, from “Craig Drake V,” his fifth solo at the Hero Complex Gallery. The poster, in other versions too, will first be on sale tomorrow at the gallery (2020 South Robertson Blvd., Studio D, Los Angeles, CA) and then online Sunday, December 16 at this link. Outside of that, the gallery has only revealed one other poster and it’s equally awesome.

a person posing for the camera

Yup, that’s Lydia Deetz from Beetlejuice. How often do you see posters of Lydia Deetz from Beetlejuice? Not too often, and definitely not done in Drake’s style, which works just as well on something metallic like RoboCop, or a human like Lydia.

Unfortunately, that’s all we can reveal of what’s in the show for now. We do know that there will be “one-of-a-kind” prints with “specialty printing and paper,” according to the gallery. Also, as we mentioned, the show marks the debut of a super impressive book set that features Drake’s art all the way back from his days working at Lucasfilm, up to and including stuff from earlier this year.

Here are some images of the set, which may or may not have an intro written by yours truly. (Full disclosure: It does.)

a close up of a card © Provided by Allure Media Pty Ltd

The Craig Drake Collection

© Provided by Allure Media Pty Ltd

a close up of a card © Provided by Allure Media Pty Ltd

a close up of a computer © Provided by Allure Media Pty Ltd

That set is $83 and, again, will be on sale first at the gallery Friday and then online Sunday. Check back next week for more pieces from the secretive show—and maybe even a tale or two of sleep deprivation and expensive purchases.

OK fine, post-credits scene. See that logo on the book set? With the “V” for “Five” and the two circles? Well, those two circles look a lot like a certain dual sunset, don’t they? Hmmm.

a screenshot of a computer

For more info on all of this, head to HCG Art.

Hundreds of Photos Form a Single Portrait of Britain’s Decline

The journey to the camera takes many paths. English artist Emily Allchurch began her career as a sculptor; it was at the Royal College of Art, where she earned her master’s degree, that she began incorporating photographs into her work. And although photography is now her primary medium—Allchurch best known for her intricate photo collages based on Old Master paintings—that sculptural background can still be glimpsed in the way she digitally assembles hundreds of photographs into fantastical tableaux of British buildings and monuments.

“I would say my photographs are created, not taken,” Allchurch explains. “Photography is simply the most relevant material I could use to explore the issues I want to in my work.”

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    Allchurch’s most recent image, “Ghost Towers (After Piranesi),” is modeled on Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s etching “Ancient Circus of Mars with Neighboring Monuments Viewed at the Via Appia,” from the Italian artist’s Roman Antiquities series. Allchurch was drawn to Piranesi because of his background as a failed architect and because of what she calls his “sense of the theatrical.” The etching, one of Piranesi’s capriccios, or fantasies, depicts a Roman cityscape packed with statues, monuments, and architecture. It’s a view of Rome that exists only in the imagination of the artist.

    Allchurch’s image maintains the compositional structure of Piranesi’s etching but replaces the Roman artifacts with British iconography ranging from the Glasgow Necropolis to the latest London high-rises. She started by assembling an “image library” from photographs she took at sites around the United Kingdom, then copied and pasted the images onto the Photoshop equivalent of a blank canvas. Once the hundreds of individual elements were in place, Allchurch blended them into a cohesive landscape by adjusting the colors and adding digital shadows. The process took several months.

    “The image is a fantasy, of course, but it’s essential that it comes from photographs I’ve actually taken,” she says. “I could take you to the place where I shot each element.”

    In the final image, modern high-rises dominate the background while, in the foreground, homeless people sleep in tents amidst the tombs and headstones of an ancient cemetery. The work’s title, “Ghost Towers,” refers to the proliferation of luxury condominium towers in London, many of which are uninhabited by their foreign owners. “They’ve been bought as an investment and nobody’s living in them,” Allchurch says. “Meanwhile, there are all these people who can’t afford to live in the city where they grew up. Homelessness has gone up so much in the past few years.”

    Like the Roman monuments in Piranesi’s original etching, the funerary artifacts in Allchurch’s image are intended as mementos mori, reminders that the shiny new buildings going up in London will one day crumble. “I suppose it’s a warning against architectural hubris,” Allchurch says. “All over the UK there are these massive building projects going on. But empires can collapse, just as ancient Rome collapsed.”

    A large-scale, lightbox version of the image will debut in January at the London Art Fair. The presentation is part of Allchurch’s love of the theatrical, which she shares with Piranesi. “I want the lighted image to be like a window into another world,” she says. “Literally.”

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    Fine Art: 49th Annual Garden State Watercolor Society Exhibition

    The Garden State Watercolor Society is on the brink of its half century mark. If the current 49th Annual Juried Exhibition now showing at The Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie is any indication, the Society is not only thriving, but is stronger than ever.

    Sixty paintings culled from a group more than twice that size are on display and of them, thirteen were singled out for awards.

    Hunterdon County artist and illustrator James Fiorentino was the recipient of the coveted Best in Show distinction for his “Country Road,” a wide rectangular work offering the view of farm buildings, a silo and a bare tree standing sentinel. Viewing it is like slowly enjoying the peacefulness of the scene as you bike along at a leisurely pace on any one of our farmland roads in this region. Fiorentino is best known for his sports art and portraiture and has recently added wildlife and landscapes to his portfolio. Visit his website, jamesfiorentino.com, and you will be amazed at what you will find he has achieved at his relatively young age of 41 years. This is the quality of art you will find in this exhibit at Ellarslie.

    The GSWS Memorial Award in honor of Trenton Artist, the late Marge Chavooshian, was presented to Mark Schreiber by Chavooshian’s daughter, sculptor Nora Chavooshian, at the opening reception in November. Schreiber’s highly detailed painting “From the Schuylkill River” was done entirely by Schreiber dipping his brushes in red wine. Study it and you will see he must have begun by laying in broad washes of diluted wine and then going in layer by detailed layer with pure wine.   You will also notice his signature wine bottle (or possibly goblet) marks on the surface of the painting. This is the originality of the art you will find in this exhibit at Ellarslie.

    Although this is a “watercolor exhibition,” keep in mind it is open to artists working in a wide variety of aqueous mediums, not jus transparent watercolor pigments.

    James Twogood, AWS/NWS/AAA, who served as juror, says in his Juror’s Statement, “In making my selections I looked for creativity, mastery of the medium and an overall artistic aesthetic. …Many of the works, especially the prize winners,” he says, “had a little something extra. For me these artists managed to create a work of art that was greater than the sum of its parts.”

    Joanne Bodnar’s “Rolling Out” meets that criteria. This painting presents several oranges and a patterned bowl on a white table top along with a paper bag from which a multitude of blueberries have spilled. You can clearly see she is adept at handling her medium. But also consider her wise decision to choose a wide horizontal format allowing the blueberries and oranges to spill freely. And her decision to keep it to a limited palette of just the orange tones, the blues and the white–even in the sliver of background.

    Another that meets he criteria is Elizabeth Oberman’s “The Boys of Summer” which was given the Holbein Artist Materials Award.   This too is a limited palette painting done in a horizontal format, both of which portray the subject matter in the best possible way. It’s a painting of six boys, all wearing grey billed red ball caps, arms and hands dangling over a grey fence as they seemingly watch what’s going on in an unseen ball field.

    And then there are the artists who use the water medium in a less traditional way. Take Margie Samuels’ “On The Water,” for example, where she expresses her response to a ship in suggested strokes of black, grays and a bit of rose in a mist of blue water and atmosphere. And Gloria Wiernik whose “Rocky Landscape” comprises bursts and bleeds of color which she then outlines in white, employing her always successful signature style.

    Carolyn Peterson’s “A Very Puzzling Still Life” was given the Warga Artist Award. She filled the picture plane with color, patterning and design. This is a painting where you find yourself spending a lot of time letting your eyes travel, almost captivated, from one interesting segment to another.

    Robert Heyer was honored with the Blick Art Materials Honorable Mention for his “All That Jazz” in which he captures the white-bearded guitarist bent over his instrument that is surrounded by a rising cloud of atmosphere.

    There are many urban and country town street scenes in the show capturing life in New Jersey. Especially well done are Mark de Mos’ “Crosstown Traffic” and Richard Hoffman’s “Point Pleasant.”

    And there are the exotic works that are surely captivating, such as Beth Alyse Kantor’s “Prince of the Desert,” a princely drawn and decorated camel, and Michael Scherfen’s “Barcelona Dragon.” This exquisite work of art shows the snake-like dragon in intricate detail, coiled, mouth open, teeth exposed. And setting the scene perfectly is Deborah Paglione’s GSWS Members Silver Award winner, “Pagoda Pond” in which a red-railed foot bridge spans a green stream and a multi-windowed red pagoda is seen amid thick green vegetation.

    There are portraits and figurative paintings, abstractions and peaceful landscapes, highly-detailed and expressionistically rendered florals, and birds and horses, boats and bridges. There’s something for every one of us to relate to and enjoy in the peacefulness of the Ellarslie museum galleries.

    Says Tess Fields, President of the Garden State Watercolor Society, “This art, and this gem of a place is so much more than ‘good art.” In this increasingly difficult world, the creation and experiencing of art provides a much-needed refuge.”

    This is the quality of art you will find in this exhibit at Ellarslie.

    IF YOU GO:

    WHAT: Garden State Watercolor Society, 49th Annual Juried Exhibition

    WHERE: The Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie, Cadwalader Park, Trenton

    WHEN: Through January 20. Hours, Noon to 4 p.m., Wednesday-Saturday;

                            1 to 4 p.m., Sunday. Closed municipal holidays.

    CONTACT: (609) 989-1131 or (609) 989-3621. www.ellarslie.org, tms@ellarslie.org

    Follow NJ.com on Twitter @njdotcom. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Three to See Friday: art about our oil bust and Spidey learns who to trust

    Alana Bartol’s Orphan Well Adoption Agency runs through Jan. 26 at Latitude 53. supplied

    Alana Bartol opening: With her tongue firmly in cheek, Calgary artist Alana Bartol re-imagines industrial remediation as a non-profit agency that finds caretakers for orphaned oil and gas wells in Alberta in her new show aptly called Orphan Well Adoption Agency.

    On Saturday at 1 p.m., she’ll also be leading a water-witching workshop showing people how to dowse — which, while there’s no scientific evidence it actually works, she uses in her art practice. Register for that at Eventbrite, and by all means, come to the opening the night before.

    image

    Alana Bartol is hosting a dowsing workshop 1 p.m. Saturday. supplied

    Details: 7 p.m. at Latitude 53 (10242 106 St.), no charge

    Boney M feat. Liz Mitchell: There are about as many versions of Boney M out there as there are months of the year, but Liz Mitchell was one of the band’s original singers, so even if German founder Frank Farian isn’t around, you’re going to get that early-days sound.

    The band sold 80 million records on the backs of hits like Daddy Cool, Mary’s Boy Child — Oh My Lord, Rivers of Babylon and, oddly one of the songs that made me first embrace my Russian blood, Rasputin. The perfect way to have a bit of a Boney M Christmas — with hopefully a little Nightflight to Venus thrown in.

    Details: show starts 9 p.m. at River Cree (300 E Lapotac Blvd.), $49.99 and up at rivercreeresort.com
    Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse: Rolling Stone calls this one “the greatest Spider-Man movie of them all,” which isn’t really that hard, come to think of it (as long as we’re not counting any Avengers movies). But this film, centring on the latest version of ol’ webhead, Miles Morales, faces head-on the Spider-phant in the room: the fact 56 years since he first appeared on the page, most people think that should be Peter Parker under the red mask. This is the perfect primer then, which — amazingly — features Peter Porker: The Spectacular Spider-Ham.
    Details: various showtimes and prices around town, check edmontonmovieguide.com
    fgriwkowsky@postmedia.com @fisheyefoto

    Indian River bazaars, art shows have unique gifts for family and friends

    Willi Miller, Special to TCPalm Published 2:00 p.m. ET Dec. 13, 2018

    Buzz60’s Elizabeth Keatinge shows us some pretty extravagant holiday gifts. Buzz60

    Bazaars and art shows are a good place to fine unique gifts.(Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

    What? You haven’t finished your shopping yet and you’re beginning to feel frazzled, possibly even desperate?

    Relax. Treasure Coast arts organizations have you covered and everybody wins.

    If you missed the Sebastian River Art Club’s Holiday Bazaar last weekend, never fear. Donna Wares, interim president of the club, says their Little Gems still will be available Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays throughout the holidays at the club at 1245 Main St. in Sebastian.

    Little Gem could apply to the Sebastian River Art Club itself, but in this case it describes  very small works of art created by members for display or as tree ornaments for this annual fundraiser, now in its sixth year.

    The club project has provided the Ecumenical Council Food Pantry with $1,300 already this season for its holiday meals program.

    Sebastian River Art Club is an all-volunteer organization with about 180 members, 50 or so of them the volunteers that keep things humming, Wares said. A member of the club for seven years, she will become vice president in the new year when Richard Gillmor takes over the helm. 

    Wares has been the club’s Art Around Town chairperson for four years, coordinating art exhibits — yes, around town.

    “We currently exhibit in Sebastian River Medical Center, Riverside Coffee Tea and Books, Sebastian Chamber of Commerce, North County Library, Sebastian City Hall and some other small businesses and doctor offices,” she said

    Like many newcomers to the area, Wares joined the club as a seasonal resident and “found the friendly atmosphere and willingness to share a godsend. It is truly an inspiring club with very talented artists.”

    Members share their talent and experience in workshops and classes all year, open to the public. Schedules and registration information is on the Web site.

    Some of the remaining Little Gems will be for sale in the club tent at the Art by the River show 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Dec. 15 in Riverview Park in Sebastian.(www.sebastianriverartclub.com)

    Vero Beach Art Club’s final Art in the Park for 2018 is in good time for holiday shopping, Dec. 16. Dozens of artist members set up their displays on Ocean Drive at Humiston Park in Vero Beach from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at least once a month through season, usually beginning in November and ending in April. Jan.6 will be the first Art in the Park in the new year.

    Other gift ideas

    Vero Beach Railroad Station, 1992

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    Ocean Grill, 1993

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    Merrill P. Barber Bridge, 1994

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    Dodgertown, 1995

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    Downtown Vero Beach, 1996

    Buy Photo

    Indian River Citrus, 1997

    Buy Photo

    Pelican Island National Refuge, 1998

    Buy Photo

    McKee Botanical Garden, 1999

    Buy Photo

    Center for the Arts, 2000

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    Driftwood Inn, 2001

    Buy Photo

    Memorial Island, 2002

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    Jungle Trail, 2003

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    Pocahontas Park, 2004

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    Vero Beach Municipal Airport, 2005

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    Heritage Center, 2006

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    Sebastian Inlet, 2007

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    Cattlemen of Indian River County, 2008

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    Woman's Club, 2009

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    Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge, 2010

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    The Treasure Coast, 2011

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    Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, 2012

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    Indian River Lagoon, 2013

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    Jaycee Park and Conn Beach, 2014

    Buy Photo

    Environmental Learning Center, 2015

    Buy Photo

    Royal Palm Pointe Park, 2016

    Buy Photo

    Old Vero Ice Age is the subject of the 2017 Christmas

    Buy Photo

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    The Garden Club of Indian River County, www.gardenclubofirc.org, has created a Vero Beach Centennial tree ornament, presented in a gift box with a history by Alma Lee Loy for 2018. Outlets are on the Web site. 

    Riverside Theatre and Vero Beach Theatre Guild are offering gift certificates to stuff in a stocking or hang on a tree.

    The experts at Simply Money give tips on how to scale back spending money on gifts during the holiday season. Cincinnati Enquirer

    Holiday music

    There’s plenty of holiday music this weekend. Handel’s Messiah is 7 p.m Dec. 15-16 at First Baptist Church of Vero Beach. (treasurecoastchorale.org)

    Indian River Charter High School’s holiday concert is in two venues: First United Methodist Church 7 p.m. Dec. 16  and St. John of the Cross Catholic Church 7 p.m. Dec. 17  (irchs.org)

    Willi Miller writes about Indian River County. Contact her at caribsea@bellsouth.net.

    Read or Share this story: www.tcpalm.com/story/entertainment/whattodoin772/2018/12/13/irc-bazaars-art-shows-have-unique-gifts-family-and-friends/2242392002/

    31 Famous Artists From Malaysia And China Join Forces For Ipoh’s First 90 Feet Longest Scroll Painting

    KUALA LUMPUR, Dec 13 (Bernama) — For the first time in Ipoh, 31 renowned artists from Malaysia and China will join forces to showcase and demonstrate their unique painting skills and styles through a 90 feet Long Scroll group painting session at Grayhaus Living Arts Gallery, 119 Jalan Sultan Idris Shah, 30000 Ipoh on December 17, 2018 at 10.30 AM. This painting show will last for 2 hours, followed by official launch of Perak in Watercolour 2.0 Malaysia-China Artists Exchange and Exhibition and the official opening of Grayhaus Living Arts Gallery at 12.30 PM. Public will get to view 33 watercolour paintings from 11 famous China artists and 55 watercolour paintings from 30 Malaysia best watercolourists in the presence of most participating artists.

    At the long scroll painting event, public will be invited to interact with the celebrity artists from China, in particular Professor Tu WeiNeng and Mr Hu XiaoXing whose artworks are prized internationally. They are joined by 9 wel l-known China artists namely Gang Peng, Liu Yu, Shaohua Wang, Wu Yulong, Chen Hong, Daibo Yan, Xie Yuan, Xiaozhuang Wei and JianYun Zhang, each representing the 9 China regional art associations. Malaysian public can now get to interact with them at one place: Ipoh.

    For the full text, click here

    WORLD’S LEADING FINE ART DEALERS ANNOUNCE HIGHLIGHTS FOR MASTER DRAWINGS NEW YORK 2019

    Acclaimed Event Returns to Manhattan’s Upper East Side from Saturday, January 26 through Saturday, February 2, 2019

    Preview: Friday, January 25, 4-8 PM

    Thirty of the world’s leading international art dealers have announced highlights to be exhibited at the highly-anticipated 2019 edition of Master Drawings New York (MDNY). The event takes place from Saturday, January 26th through Saturday, February 2nd on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Some of the most influential names in the business, some exhibiting for the very first time, are dedicated to drawings, paintings, watercolors, sculpture and oil sketches from the 14th to the 21st centuries.

    Now in its 13th year, the annual week-long event presents an exciting showcase of concurrent pop-up gallery exhibitions by visiting dealers from London, Paris, Madrid, Amsterdam, Brussels and Vienna, and special presentations mounted in private gallery spaces by top New York specialists. These take place in galleries mostly along Madison Avenue on Manhattan’s Upper East Side.

    Last year, MDNY expanded its reach to feature paintings and sculpture and offered collectors, curators and art lovers a spectacular selection of works presented by a broader range of specialist dealers. This has been even further strengthened in quality with some top names joining for the first time. They are Ambrose Naumann Fine Art (New York), Galerie Kugel (Paris), Jack Kilgore (New York), Leon Tovar (New York), Robert Simon (New York), Mark Brady (New York), Stuart Lochhead (London), Hazlitt (New York/London), Thomas Deprez Fine Art (Belgium), Pavel Zoubok (New York), Jeroen Jurjens (Amsterdam), Benjamin Proust (London).

    A SELECTION OF MASTER DRAWINGS NEW YORK 2019

    EXHIBITOR HIGHLIGHTS

    Benjamin Proust Fine Art Ltd.

    Femme Nue Allongée, circa 1900

    Auguste Rodin (Paris 1840 – Meudon 1917)

    Pencil  and stumping  on paper With  artist’s stamp ‘Rodin’  (lower right) 19.2 x 30  cm

    Christopher Bishop Fine Art

    Saint Ursula, ca. 1583

    Bartholomeus Spranger (Antwerp 1546 – Prague 1611)

    Pen and brown ink over traces of black chalk with red and green washes. Squared for transfer. 197 x 162 mm (7 3/4 x 6 1/3 in.)

    David Tunick, Inc

    On the Blue Swamp, 1966

    Alexander Calder (1898-1976)Watercolor on paper, 780 x 580 mm.

    Didier Aaron, Inc.

    Cupid dictating a letter to a young woman, Executed c. 1765-70

    Jean-Baptiste Greuze (1725 – 1805)

    Pen and ink and grey wash heightened with white gouache on blue paper, 410 x 306 mm (16 x 12 in.)

    Findlay Galleries

    The Willow and the Bather

    Childe Hassam (1859-1935)

    Watercolor, Charcoal and Gouache on Paperboard, 362 x 254 mm (14 1/4 x 10 in.)

    Galerie J. Kugel

    Portrait of Henri II, King of France, Circa 1553

    Léonard Limosin (1519-1559)Enamel on copper

    A highlight of the exhibition, “Portraits from the French Renaissance Drawings, Paintings, Enamels and Sculptures”

    Guy Peppiatt

    The Garden of Paradise – or Comforts of a Bed of Roses

    James Gillray (1757-1815)Pen and brown and black ink and red and black chalks over pencil33.5 by 24 cm., 13 1/4 by 9 1/2 in

    Hazlitt

    Venus at the forge of Vulcan, asking for arms for Cupid

    Biagio Pupini, called Biagio delle Lame (1511-1575)pen and brown ink, heightened with a white, red and brown wash on prepared paper293 x 205 mm (11 5/8 x 8 in)

    James Mackinnon

    The Artist’s Hands

    Henry Moore (1898-1986)

    Charcoal and ballpoint pen on wove paper, 254 x 181 cm (10 x 7 1/8 in.)

    Jill Newhouse

    Portrait of an Actor or Self-Portrait Caricature, c. 1890

    Edouard Vuillard, (1868-1940)

    Pastel on grey paper

    30.5 x 21.9 mm (12 x 8 5/8 in.)

    Mia N. Weiner

    Orfeo

    Giorgio de Chirico (1888 – 1978)

    Charcoal, brush with black ink and wash, brown chalk.

    477 x 327 mm (18 7/8 x  12 7/8 in.). Signed at lower right of drawing: G. de Chirico. titled below drawing: Orfeo.  

    Mireille Mosler, Ltd.

    The Evening Star, 1871

    Simeon Solomon (1840-1905)

    Watercolor on paper

    12 x 9 3/8 in (30.5 x 24.1 cm.)

    Monogrammed & dated ‘SS 1871’

    Pavel Zoubok Fine Art

    Untitled (from a 1931 Sketchbook)

    Arshile Gorky (1902-1948)

    Ink on paper

    12 1/2 x 9 3/8 inches

    Part of a special exhibition of early drawings by Arshile Gorky from the private collection of legendary dealer and champion of Surrealism, Julien Levy, during the 1970s.

    Robert Simon Fine Art

    Ruins of the Mithraic Mysteries, 2018

    Pen and sepia ink and wash on toned paper

    12″ x 15″ inches

    Part of the exhibition Introducing Anthony Baus: After the Antique at Master Drawings New York

    Stephen Ongpin Fine Art

    White Form (La Forme Blanche)

    Vasily (Wassily) Kandinsky (1866-1944)

    Gouache on black paper, laid down on board.

    322 x 498 mm. (12 5/8 x 19 5/8 in.)

    Stuart Lochhead

    Study for the head of Saint John the Baptist, Conceived circa 1878

    Auguste Rodin (1840-1917)

    Plaster, 14cm (5 ½”) high

    This plaster made circa 1885-90

    Thomas Deprez

    Self-portrait of the artist

    Frantz Charlet (1862-1928)

    Pastel on paper  mounted on canvas, 880  x 1200 mm

    Signed lower left  “f. Charlet”

    PROVENANCE:  By descent into  the family of the  artist

    Tomasso Brothers Fine Art

    Laocoön and his Sons After the Antique

    Italian, late 17th / early 18th centuryBronze52 cm high, 39 cm wide, 20 cm deep

    W.M. Brady & Co.

    A Seated Sibyl Holding Books and a Tablet with a Putto

    Michelangelo Anselmi (1491-1554)

    Red and black chalk, 211 x 206 mm (8 3/8 x 8 1/8 in.)

    W&K – Wienerroither & Kohlbacher | Fine Art

    Girl Leaning On Her Elbow, 1915

    Egon Schiele (1890-1918)Charcoal on paper, 19.7 x 13.1 inch

    Signed and dated lower left

    **Click here to read about MDNY 2019 Institutional Partnership Events and to view the full 2019 exhibitor list. Download hi-res images here & to view and download an exhibitor MAP click here.**

    Master Drawings New Yorkhttp://www.masterdrawingsinnewyork.com/ About Master Drawings New York

    Established in 2006 and co-founded by Margot Gordon and Crispian Riley-Smith, Masters Drawings New York (MDNY) is the pre-eminent event for exhibiting and celebrating old master through contemporary drawings in the United States. Dealers from the United States and Europe showcase their highest quality drawings in galleries along Madison Avenue on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Scheduled for the last week of January, the event coincides with the major Old Master auctions and scholarly events focused on drawings. It is a week dedicated to historic art, where collectors, scholars, museum curators and dealers travel to New York from around the world to view artwork and participate in the events around the city.

    Press Contact: MDNY PressMaster Drawings New Yorkpress@masterdrawingsinnewyork.com

    St. Bernard Art Guild recognizes best works at show

    Claire Pescay is winner of the Best of Show Award from the St. Bernard Art Guild Nov. 3 show for her “Barn Owl” painting. 

    In the category of art under glass, the winners are Pio Lyons, first; Pescay, second; Victoria Graves, third; and Elaine Hodges, Barbara Hayes and Lyons, honorable mentions.

    In the category of art not under glass, the winners are Hodges, first and second; Graves, third; and Pescay, Donna Lind and Janet Attaway, honorable mentions. 

    In the photography category, the winners are Graves, first; Beth Vincent, second; Donald Crais, third; and Marie Alverez, Beth Vincent and Crais, honorable mentions.

    In the category of three-dimensional artworks, the winners are Graves, first and second; Ron Chapman, third; and Laura Brakas, George Rouse and Corinne Barreca, honorable mentions.

    Speciality awards went to Brigio Grace Himal, landscape; Rodney Asevedo, maritime; Meg McNut, spiritual; Lynn Battle, children; Battle, floral; Asevedo, portrait; Graves, wildlife; Crais, abstract; Hodges, still life; Attaway, patriotic; and Barreca, St. Bernard theme. 

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