Alfonso Cuarón’s ‘Roma’ is a critical darling. He shows us the Mexico City movie theater and streets that shaped it

Roma was one of those early 20th century neighborhoods that aspired to the European — in the words of historian Enrique De Anda, an attempt “to make of Mexico, the Vienna or Paris of the Americas.” The northern half was grander, in a late 19th century, Beaux Arts way. The southern half, Roma Sur, where Cuarón’s family lived, was more Modern and residential. By the ’70s, the neighborhood was fraying in parts, referred to in jest as “Colonia Roña,” remembers the director. “It’s like a scab.”